Officially a PhD Candidate!

On November 16th, I successfully defended my original proposal in front of my preliminary committee and officially became a PhD candidate! I was looking forward to this day all through the summer and fall. [I have written about the entire process of our preliminary examination in my previous blog post.] I submitted my written proposal a month before my oral defense date and received feedback from my committee about the experiments proposed and the validity of my hypothesis. I am extremely grateful for each and every one of my preliminary committee members for taking the time to review my proposal and for providing their valuable feedback and criticism. This entire process helped me grow as a scientist and helped me think and write critically. I am also grateful for my family and friends who took the time to review my proposal, attended my practice talks, and provided useful comments.

As mentioned in my previous post, our graduate program requires us to pick a topic outside our main research area and develop an NIH-style original proposal related to the chosen topic. I chose to study the role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). MDSCs are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that suppress or down-regulate the effector T cell responses in various immune microenvironments. In tumor microenvironments, T cells help kill the tumor cells and prevent the tumor cells from growing. However, MDSCs suppress these T cells and prevent them from killing the tumor cells thereby causing the cancer cells to proliferate. An autoimmune microenvrionment is opposite to the tumor microenvironment. In T1D, the T cells become autoreactive i.e., the T cells start killing the innocent insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. This leads to reduced insulin production and increased glucose in the bloodstream in the body. Insulin is an important hormone that helps in the transfer of glucose molecules into the cells that can then serve as the energy source for the cells and tissues. The destruction of the pancreatic beta cells therefore leads to an imbalance in the glucose homeostasis in the body. In such a microenvironment, we require MDSCs to suppress the T cells and prevent them from destroying the beta cells in the pancreas. The first question to ask here is, are MDSCs induced during T1D? The answer is yes. It was shown in 2014 that T1D patients have an increased MDSC induction in their peripheral blood. As to the best of my knowledge, this is the ONLY study that focusses on the native (body’s own) MDSCs during T1D. However, not much is known about the MDSCs and the different subpopulations of these cells that exists that are responsible for interacting with T cells in the pancreas. MDSC subsets and their mechanism of action are dependent on the specific tissue or the site of inflammation. Understanding the role of MDSCs in T1D and the specific MDSC subsets involved in T1D lead to several questions. I chose to investigate a few in my proposal:

  1. If MDSCs are induced in T1D patients, why are they unable to suppress the T cell responses in the pancreas? i.e., Are MDSCs defective during T1D?
  2. What are the specific subsets of MDSCs induced during T1D that are specific to the pancreatic microenvironment? MDSCs are incredibly heterogeneous and can exhibit several phenotypic and molecular states. These subsets are unique to the local tissue microenvironment.
  3. What is an MDSC-specific immune regulatory molecule and its corresponding pathway implicated in T1D that may contribute to disease pathogenesis? 

Without going into the details of each question posed, I proposed several experiments and techniques ranging from single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of the MDSC populations in the pancreas to generating MDSC-specific conditional gene knockout experiments in mice to answer these key questions. There were a few flaws in my experiments that were brought up during the presentation and I tried to address them to the best of my ability by proposing alternative approaches. Overall, my committee members were impressed with the breadth of background knowledge and experiments presented. The most important factor was to develop a hypothesis-driven proposal with a solid premise to back my hypothesis. The presentation didn’t feel one-sided and eventually developed into a curiosity-driven discussion.

Transitioning from a PhD student to a PhD candidate is a backbreaking process. Perhaps it is meant to be this way. Even though I felt numb for a few hours after the conclusion of my presentation, I could feel the academic apocalypse building up in a cloud over my head already. Here’s hoping for more successes and vital experiences in the future!

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